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Swival Games

'The Swival Brain Window'


The term ‘Brain’ is actually just another way of referring to the ‘logic’ followed by the computer in computing its next ‘Black’ move in response to all of the Red players moves throughout the entire game. Once the game has ended, the Brain display provides the opportunity for both players to:
- review the entire game
- reconsider each of their individual moves
- help formulate their ideas as to implementing a better strategy for all future games

The Brain window provides the following two types of information:

1) Player vs Player:

In a game of ‘Player vs Player’ the computer simply records and displays all the moves made by both the Red and Black players throughout the entire game. This includes not only the dropspot selected by each player but also whether that player then also chooses to swivel either to the LEFT or to the RIGHT.

2) Player VS Computer:

In a game of ‘Player vs Computer’ the computer records and displays not only the individual moves played by the Red player but also the logic i.e. strategy used by the computer itself to decide on its next move.
See pic -->>


Brain Moves

Brain Display Box:

The black textbox at the top of the screen displays all the Red and Black moves made by either Players or Computer as described above.

Display JUST moves:

Clicking on this button will change the contents of the Brain thinking box to display the following two pieces of information:
a) The dropspot position chosen for by both Players or Computer each and every move.
b) Any additional swivel to either LEFT or to the RIGHT made by both Players or Computer.

Dropspot positions ares defined as follows:
The outer circle contains dropspots 1 - 8. Dropspot 1 is positioned at 1:00 o'clock. Dropspot 8 is positioned at 11:00 o'clock.
The middle circle contains dropspots 9 - 16. Dropspot 9 is positioned at 1:00 o'clock. Dropspot 16 is positioned at 11:00 o'clock.
The inner circle contains dropspots 17 - 24. Dropspot 17 is positioned at 1:00 o'clock. Dropspot 24 is positioned at 11:00 o'clock.

Display BRAIN thinking:

Clicking on this button will change the contents of the Brain Display Box to display not only the information as above but also display the basic logic followed by the Computer in calculating its move in response to all Red’s moves made throughout the entire game

The BRAIN Matrix:

The twelve squares displayed as a 3 x 8 matrix is used by the computer to record where all counters both Red and Black have been played so far. This information is needed by the computer to not only track where all counters have been played so far but also enable the computer to implement its own logic while calculating its own Black’s next best move.

Click here to view BRAIN in Notepad:

Clicking on this button will open the MS Windows Notepad app to display the contents of both the:
- ‘Display JUST moves’ and
- ‘Display BRAIN thinking’
This provides a simple way that players can review, save and print computer game playing logic for future use.

Sample Logic followed by the computer:

The logic implemented by the computer will have two aims:

a) What is Black’s best move in response to the move just played by Red.
b) What is Black’s best move in response to ALL of Red’s moves played so far.

The exact move made by the computer will vary slightly depending on all of Red’s moves made so far.

Here is a typical example of the computer’s logic for the next Black move:

Brain thinking for Move = 5
Check if Black has a line of three.
Check if Red has line of three.
Black must swivel Right.
Check if Black can now swivel into LO3.
Check if Black can now swivel into line of two.
Black played (2) Black then swiveled Clockwise.
Now it's Reds turn to play.

Example #1: Check if Black has a line of three.

The first ‘line of thought’ i.e. logic implemented by the computer, is the check whether the computer currently has a line or three Black counters on the board. If so, the computer can then lay its next winning Black counter on the middle circle.

Example #2: Check if Red has a line of three.

If Black does not have a line of three then the second ‘line of thought’ implemented by the computer, is to check whether the Red player has a line or three Red counters on the board. If so, the computer must then calculate its best possible response to not only stop Red’s line three but also to make a beneficial move of its own in response.

A further explanation of the logic followed by the computer will NOT be provide here.

We will leave this challenge to all future players of the game of Swival.

Swival Games Inc.